“THE GHOST BUS”: ART AND EMOTIONS FOR WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY 2022

#WorldAutismAwarenessDay2022 #April2

Autistic are able to see what human beings don’t see.” It is a phrase by Temple Grandin, who has dedicated a lifetime to reflect, understand and raise awareness on the issues and realities of autism. And on April 2, when World Autism Awareness Day 2022 is celebrated, it is nice to remember these words, which I associate with a beautiful experience.

In these video I present scenes from a creative experience which involved autistic and disabled kids (in Aprilia, Latina, Italy). Led by teacher Patrizia Sapri, they worked to reproduce the pictures I took around an old and rusty bus at Bartons Plc (Beeston – Nottingham, UK) for “The Ghost Bus / A visual adventure in the Land of Robin Hood”, project I made with Bartons Plc, Barton Garage,Simon Barton, ACT Art Culture Tourism by Marysia Zipser. These images, in their tenderness, confirm the words of Temple Grandin and invite us, every day, to discover the richness of each different normality.

Soundtrack: “Day One” by Audiomachine.

For info: okayredazione@gmail.com

3 pensieri riguardo ““THE GHOST BUS”: ART AND EMOTIONS FOR WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY 2022

  1. As a boy with autism spectrum disorder, ACEs and high sensitivity (all of which is still not formally diagnosed) thus admittedly not always easy to deal with, the first and most formidable authority-figure abuser with whom I was terrifyingly trapped was my Grade 2 teacher, Mrs. Carol, in the early 1970s.

    Although I can’t recall her abuse against me in its entirety, I’ll nevertheless always remember how she had the immoral audacity — and especially the unethical confidence in avoiding any professional repercussions — to blatantly readily aim and fire her knee towards my groin, as I was backed up against the school hall wall. Fortunately, though, she missed her mark, instead hitting the top of my left leg.

    While there were other terrible teachers, for me she was uniquely traumatizing, especially when she wore her dark sunglasses when dealing with me.

    I didn’t tell anyone about my ordeal with her. Rather than consciously feel victimized, I felt some misplaced shame. And as each grade passed, I increasingly noticed how all recipients of corporeal handling/abuse in my school were boys; and I had reasoned thus normalized to myself that it was because men can take care of themselves and boys are basically little men.

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